Ideology– No One Can Criticize Islam

Daniel Pipes comments in his blog that the Pope’s statements about historical Islam and its violent heritage has led to multiple episodes of violence and threats of murder, perhaps doing more to confirm the comments than anything that an intellectual discussion might have produced.  He sees the goal of the semi-orchestrated Muslim uproar as to attempt to impede discussion of Islam and its contribution to world violence and terror (Islamo-fasicsm) and therefore place non-Muslims under the same strictures as members of the faith. 

-excerpts:….

  • In Britain, while leading a rally outside Westminster Cathedral, Anjem Choudary of Al-Ghurabaa called for the pope “to be subject to capital punishment.”
  • In Iraq, the Mujahideen’s Army threatened to “smash the crosses in the house of the dog from Rome” and other groups made blood-curdling threats.
  • In Kuwait, an important website called for violent retribution against Catholics.
  • In Somalia, the religious leader Abubukar Hassan Malin urged Muslims to “hunt down” the pope and kill him “on the spot.”
  • In India, a leading imam, Syed Ahmed Bukhari, called on Muslims to “respond in a manner which forces the pope to apologise.”
  • A top Al-Qaeda figure announced that “the infidelity and tyranny of the pope will only be stopped by a major attack.”

… Seven churches were attacked in the West Bank and Gaza, one in Basra, Iraq (prompting this ironic headline at the “RedState” blog: “Pope implies Islam a violent religion … Muslims bomb churches“). The murder of an Italian nun in Somalia and two Assyrians in Iraq also appear connected.

Second reflection: this new round of Muslim outrage, violence, and murder has a by-now routine quality. Earlier versions occurred in 1989 (in response to Salman Rushdie‘s novel, The Satanic Verses), 1997 (when the U.S. Supreme Court did not take down a representation of Muhammad), 2002 (when Jerry Falwell called Muhammad a terrorist), 2005 (the fraudulent Koran-flushing episode), and February 2006 (the Danish cartoon incident).

Vatican leaders tried to defuse the pope’s quote, as well as his condemnation of jihad (holy war). The papal spokesman, Federico Lombardi, S.J., said Benedict did not intend to give “an interpretation of Islam as violent. … inside Islam there are many different positions and there are many positions that are not violent.” Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, the secretary of state, indicated that the pope “sincerely regrets that certain passages of his address could have sounded offensive to the sensitivities of the Muslim faithful.”

Then, in what may be an unprecedented step by a pope, Benedict himself proffered the sort of semi-apology often favored by those feeling the heat. “I am deeply sorry for the reactions in some countries to a few passages of my address,” reads the official Vatican translation into English, “which were considered offensive to the sensibility of Muslims. These in fact were a quotation from a medieval text, which do not in any way express my personal thought.”

….Third reflection: the Muslim uproar has a goal: to prohibit criticism of Islam by Christians and thereby to impose Shariah norms on the West. Should Westerners accept this central tenet of Islamic law, others will surely follow. Retaining free speech about Islam, therefore, represents a critical defense against the imposition of an Islamic order.

Advertisements

One Response to “Ideology– No One Can Criticize Islam”

  1. Shoulung Says:

    When Islam is described in words as having a connection to violence, Muslims respond by – erupting in violence.

    Why does anyone still not get it?

    Two words: Willful blindness. There are defeatists among us who believe that they can make a deal with the devil for a share of the spoils.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: